Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity (SOGI) Resources

17 of 24 items

An LGBTQIA+ Vocabulary | An Updated CLGS Resource for Faith Communities

An LGBTQIA+ Vocabulary: A Resource for Faith Communities Contents Dear Reader Defining Broad Concepts LGBTQIA+ Symbols Vocabulary Words Not to Use or to Use Only With Permission Additional Resources for LGBTQIA+ People of Faith and Allies Sources ❦ Dear Reader: Since 2000, The Center for LGBTQ and Gender Studies in Religion (CLGS) at Pacific School […]

52 Ways #39: Support Banned and Challenged Books

If you visit American Library Association’s Top 10 Most Challenged Books of 2019 and 2020, you will notice that a large percentage of them were targeted because they include positive portrayals of LGBTQ people.  When these books are removed or not included in libraries—particularly public and school libraries—people lose access to useful and affirming information […]

52 Ways #35: Expand Pronoun Options

Some people use non-gendered pronouns to identify themselves because it better reflects who they are than “he” or “she.” You can make it clear that your congregation welcomes them by creating space to name our own pronouns. And—because we respect the grammar lovers among us—let us assure you that these are perfectly acceptable in English […]

52 Ways #30: Celebrate & Include Transgender People!

Your congregation may have made the decision to welcome people of all sexual orientations before there was a significant awareness about including gender identity. You may have already talked about and worked on including gay, lesbian and bisexual people, but not transgender people.  Now is a great time to revisit those conversations and expand your […]

52 Ways #26: Intentionally Include Bisexual People

One way to increase your overall welcome is to intentionally include bisexual people.  The acronym LGBTQ has a “B” for bisexual, but sometimes communities are not as aware or welcoming as they could be.  We may say “LGBTQ” but then erase the particularities of bisexual identity.  Sometimes we make assumptions about people; for example, assuming […]